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ONLINE ISSN: 1883-2954
PRINT ISSN: 0021-1575

Tetsu-to-Hagané Vol. 45 (1959), No. 7

  • Effects of Chromium, Copper, Niobium, Sulphur, Tin and Vanadium on the Activity of Carbon in Liquid Iron.

    pp. 681-689

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    The effects of various elements on the activity coefficient of carbon in liquid iron have been studied by two experimental methods:
    (1) Equilibration with controlled mixtures of CO and CO2; (2) the solubility of graphite in the melt.
    The relationship between the activity of carbon and alloying elements, j, are expressed by the following parameters:
    For dilute solutions, ε(j)σ is obtained as follows:
    For C-saturated solution, ε(j)σ is as follows:
  • Measurement of Traveling Time of Blast Furnace Burden with 60Co

    pp. 689-694

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    The authors planned a experiment to presume the travelling time of blast furnace burden using radioisotope, 60Co. About 1mc of 60Co wire, shielded in a container of cast iron, steel or iron ore, was charged from the taphole side of the top of No. 8 or No. 10 blast furnace at Kamaishi Iron Works.
    The measurement of the travelling time was carried out by counting the radioactivity of samples taken from the molten pig iron on tapping, with a scintillation counter.
    It was proved that the travelling time was largely affected by the wind volume and the volume of one charge which was governed by the volume of sinter.
    Besides, to ascertain the time from the arrival in the tuyere zone to the appearance in the pig iron, 0.5-1.0mc of 60Co wire was thrown into the blast furnace hearth from the tuyere. The RI thrown in from the tuyere near the taphole appeared after about 15mn. in the molten iron, but the one which had been thrown from the opposite side of the taphole took long time to appear.
  • A Study on the Dephosphorization Equilibrium in an LD Converter

    pp. 694-699

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    The authers applied the dephosphorization equilibrium formulas reported by Schenck and Herasymenko to the final slag and metal of the 3-ton experimental LD converter.
    The results obtained were as follows.
    (1) The observed values of logKIVP in the Schenck's formula had a linear relation to 1/t, but they located in the upper region against the Schenck's equilibrium.
    (2) Assuming, the next formula was obtained
    (3) had a maximum value on the value of 25-30% of (T. Fe).
    (4) In the Herasymenko's formula, linear relation was obtained between logKPFe and Ca++ and this relation was expressed as follows,
    This formula had a deviation from the open-hearth formula reported by Herasymenko. This meant that the dephosphorization of an LD converter did not approach closer to the equilibrium than open-hearth furnaces.
  • Operation of the Water-Cooling Converter (Part 1)

    pp. 699-705

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    The authors studied the permanent-wall-type furnace with compulsory cooling. In this paper, the experimental results on the small converter with water cooling tuyere and jackets were reported.
    The experiments were carried out with small side blown converter and its capacity was 50kg. The results obtained were summarized as follows:
    1. Low-carbon, high-quality steel can be produced from various kinds of pig iron with the aid of pure oxygen blowing in the water cooling small converter.
    2. In this process, the general characteristics of heats were similar to the normal converter process, and several advantages were found; reduction of slag amount, longer life of the converter, etc.
    3. Thickness of permanent refractory layer obtained was 5-10mm and this thin layer would be remained as neutral lining the blowing.
  • Electron-Microscopic Observation of A-Type Nonmetallic Inclusions in Ball-Bearing Steel.

    pp. 705-712

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    A-type nonmetallic inclusions in ball-bearing steel were examined by an optical microscope, acid test and extraction method, however it was not easy to identify each inclusion by these methods. Therefore, the inclusions microscopically observed were extracted on carbon films and observed by an electron microscope, and then each inclusion was respectively identified by electron diffraction.
    Moreover, to confirm the results obtained, the materials similar to these inclusions identified were composed experimentally and examined by an optical microscope, X-ray and electron diffraction.
    In consequence, the following conclusions were obtained:
    A-type nonmetallic inclusions in ball-bearing steel were classified into two groups. That is, the one belonged to such substance as α-cristobalite (α-SiO2)+rhodonite (MnO·SiO2) and the other as manganese sulfide (MnS)+iron sulfide (FeS) or manganese sulfide only. Therefore, it was supposed that the combositions of many silicate type inclusions in this steel were in coexisted range of SiO2 and MnO·SiO2 in MnO-SiO2 system, and those of sulfide type inclusions in coexisted range bf MnS and FeS or MnS range in MnS-FeS system.
    Besides the nonmetallic inclusions above mentioned, there were a few inclusions which were composed from other components and could not be identified by electron diffraction.
  • Comparison of Mechanical Properties at Elevated Temperature of Some Commercial Ni-base Heat-Resisting Alloys.

    pp. 712-716

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    Mechanical properties at elevated temperature of six commercial Ni-base heat-resisting alloys were investigated, and the effects of Co, Mo and Nb on mechanical properties were compared.
    When compared the mechanical properties of Ni-Cr were with Ni-Cr-Co alloys, Co was found. to be effective to increase strength at high temperature and long time test, and it also increased ductility at room & elevated temperature.
    Mo was found to be effective to increase strength at high temperature, but it gave effect to decrease at high and long time test. M252 which contained 10% of Mo was found to have a lower creep rupture strength above 750°C than Inco 700 which contained lower Mo, but higher Ti, Al and Co. But M252 had the highest creep ductility at high temperature.
    Nb was found to be effective to increase high-temperature strength as well as Ti & Al. But its effect was not clear in short time test of tensile strength. Therefore, Inconel X-550 had the highest stress rupture strength among Ni-Cr alloys. Creep ductility was decreased remarkably by the addition of 1.2% Nb as Ni-Cr alloys which contained high Ti and Al.
  • Determination of SiO2, Total Fe, Al2O3, MnO, CaO and MgO in Basic Slag.

    pp. 717-722

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    This investigation was undertaken to find rapid and accurate chemical methods for the analysis of basic slag. In the report (I), a continuous titration method with EDTA is described for determination of total Fe, Al2O3, MnO, CaO and MgO which are contained in basic slag.
    Determination of SiO2: Weigh a sample of 0.5 grams. Add HCl and HClO4 and evaporate to fume. Cool, and dissolve the residue with hot water, and filter in to a 250ml. volumetric flask, wash the precipitate with hot water, and then SiO2 is determined by conventional gravimetric method.
    Determination of total Fe: Make the filterate up to 250ml. with water. Pipet 50ml. of fiilterate. Adjust to pH 2.0 with ammonium acetate, and titrate with FDTA using salicylic acid as an indicator.
    Determination of Al2O3: In the same solution, adjust to pH 3.0 with ammonium acetate, Add excess EDTA and back-titrate the excess with CuSO4 using a-pyridyl-β-azonaphthol (PAN) as an indicator.
    Determination of MnO: In the same solution, adjust to pH 4.5 with ammonium acetate. and titration is carried as above for determination of Al2O3.
    Determination of CaO plus MgO: The solution is divided into two portions. In one portion, adjust to pH 10 with NH4OH. Add excess EDTA and back-titrate the excess with CuSO4 using PAN as an indicator. Determination of MgO : After separating Ca2+ as CaC2O4 in the other portion, adjust to pH 10 with NH4OH. Titration is carried as above for determination of CaO, plus MgO. The difference in values between CaO, plus MgO, and MgO, gave the amount of CaO.
  • On the Industrial Research in the United States of America

    pp. 723-728

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  • Cold Working (III)

    pp. 729-739

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  • 抄録

    pp. 752-757

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  • 鉄鋼ニューズ

    pp. 758-759

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  • 国内国外刊行誌参考記事目次

    pp. 760-764

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