Tetsu-to-Hagané
New Arrival Alert : OFF

You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
Please click the button below.

Log in / Sign up
ONLINE ISSN: 1883-2954
PRINT ISSN: 0021-1575

Tetsu-to-Hagané Vol. 62 (1976), No. 10

  • 随想

    pp. 1307-1308

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • Rate of Hydrogen Absorption in Liquid Iron and Effect of Dissolved Oxygen

    pp. 1309-1318

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    The rate of hydrogen absorption in the liquid iron stirred inductively were measured by the Sieverts method at constant pressures. The present measurement was carried out under a small interfacial area between the gas and iron melt by using a doughnut-shaped alumina plate on the melt in a narrow crucible.
    The results show that the rates of hydrogen absorption are represented by the 1st order reaction and proportional to the square root of hydrogen pressure. The mass transfer coefficients, kH, of hydrogen into liquid iron under the present inductive stirring could be calculated as (19±1). 10-2cm/sec at 1600°C. This value was somewhat higher than those obtained by the literature probably because of the strong inductive stirring. It was found that it was also proportional to the 2/3 power of the diffusion coefficient, DH, of hydrogen in liquid iron.
    The effect of dissolved oxygen on the hydrogen absorption seemed to be negligible in the range of low oxygen contents of below 0.039% oxygen. The poisoning effect of surface active oxygen on the nitrogen transfer had been observed, but the similar effect was found in the case of hydrogen absorption.
  • Effect of Sulfur Content and Solidification Variables on Morphology and Distribution of Sulfide in Steel Ingots

    pp. 1319-1328

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    The morphology and distribution of sulfide in steel ingot have a close connection with chemical composition of steel and solidification variables. Using steels containing 0.004, 0.01, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.63%S, the authors have investigated the effects of sulfur content and solidification variables on the morphology and distribution of sulfide.
    The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) Morphologies of sulfides are dependent on sulfur content. In the range of sulfur content up to 0.01%, type I sulfide is found and with more than 0.05% sulfur, type II sulfide is observed. The higher the sulfur content, the larger the area of type II sulfide.
    2) Large dendritic sulfide (type D) as a primary phase is observed in the specimens containing 0.63% S and 2.88% Mn, and its size is dependent on the cooling rate.
    3) From the observation of three dimensional morphology of sulfide using a scanning electron micro scope, it is found that type II sulfide is dendritic and type II and Type D sulfides are occasionally inter connected.
    4) The size arid spacing are expressed as a function of the cooling rate, Vin°C /min.
    i) Average size of type I sulfide, d in μm; d=13.9 V-0.30ii) Average spacing of rod-like (type II) sulfide, λ in μm; λ=10.7 V-0.30iii) Average size of rod-like (type II) sulfide, d′ in μm; d′=2.9 V-0.22 The average size of rod-like (type II) sulfide is smaller than that of type I at the same cooling rate.
    5) Type I and type II sulfides are located in interdendritic spaces, on the other hand, type D sulfides are distributed randomly.
  • A Mathematical Model of Continuous Billet Heating Furnace

    pp. 1329-1338

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    A mathematical model of the continuous billet heating furnace simulating the dynamic behavior of billet temperature in the furnace as a function of the fuel flow rate and billet speed has been developed.
    Flame and combustion-gas temperatures along the furnace are calculated from the combustion heat and heat transfer from both the flame and the combustion-gas. Temperatures of individual billets are calculated from heat transfers from the flame or the combustion-gas and the furnace wall.
    The calculated dynamic response of the billet temperature at the extracting time with a change in the fuel flow rate from this model gives a good agreement with the response obtained by the correlation method.
  • A Method for Calculating r-value from Crystallite Orientation Distribution Function in Cold Rolled Steel Sheet

    pp. 1339-1348

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    To investigate the possibility of calculating the Lankford value, r, for a low carbon steel sheet on the basis of three-dimensional orientation distribution function, ω (ψ, θ, φ, ), comparison was made between the calculated r-value and experimental one. ψ, θ, and φ denote a set of Eulerian angles between the coordinate system of crystallite and the reference system of specimen.
    The r-values, r (ψ, θ, φ), that were specified by means of Eulerian angles in the same definition as used in describing the orientation of a crystallite in a polycrystalline sheet were computed at 5°intervals for 0°≤ψ, θ and φ≤90°, by taking into account all fourty-eight slip systems in alpha iron and by assuming that an amount of slip in each slip system was proportional to its Schmid factor.
    For a polycrystalline sheet the r-value was calculated by
    r (ω) /1+r (ω) =4/π2π/20π/20π/20r (ψ, θ, φ) /1+r (ψ, θ, φ) ω (ψ, θ, φ) sin<θdθdφ′dθ
    whereψ′=ψ+ω, and ω is an angle between rolling direction and stretching direction.
    In practical computation of r (ψ, θ, φ), the following cases were examined: (1) All slip systems whose Schmid factors were not less than a certain value, a, (0≤a<0.5), were assumed to be activated and (2) slip systems of a constant number, ss, were assumed to be activated in all the orientations.
    Calculated r-values, r (cal), were in good agreement with the observed ones, r (obs), if no crystal rotation was assumed to take place during deformation. Above all, the values of r (cal) were in accord with those of r (obs) within ± 0.15 in the case where either a=0.10 or ss=32 was assumed.
  • On the Incubation Period for Bainitic Transformation during Continuous Cooling in Steels

    pp. 1349-1355

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    The process of the consuming incubation period for bainitic transformation during continuous cooling, of steels was examined in the relation with consumption of incubation period for ferritic or pearlitic transformation by steels of JIS SUJ2, SCM5, and SNCM8. The main results are as follows: (1) There is a critical temperature (AB) at which the consumption of incubation period for bainitic transformation starts during continuous cooling.
    (2) The consumption of incubation period for bainitic transformation is progressed independently of any consumption of incubation period for ferritic of pearlitic transformation.
    (3) The bainitic transformation behaviour after a change of cooling rate during continuous cooling shows a different manner from that indicated by a usual CCT-diagram of the steel because of the different way in consumption of the incubation period. The estimation method of the transformation behaviour in such a case was explained by using usual CCT-diagram.
  • Effect of TiN Particles on the Proeutectoid Ferrite Reaciton

    pp. 1356-1362

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    The effects of TiN particles in low-arbon low alloy steels on the nucleation and growth kinetics of proeutectoid ferrite were studied. Main results are summarized as follows.
    (1) TiN particles accelerated ferrite formation and displaced the ferrite-nose in a CCT curve to shorter times.
    (2) It appeared that TiN particles served as nucleation sites for proeutectoid ferrite preferentially and may increase the rate of nucleation.
    (3) The rate of thickening of the grain boundary ferrite allotriomorphs was not influenced by TiN particles. The result could be explained well by the comparison between γ→a free energy difference and γ/α interface energy increase by the existence of TiN particles.
  • On the High Temperature Strength of Ni-Cr-W Alloys

    pp. 1363-1372

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    Alloys of Ni-Cr-W-C system were investigated to find a new forgeable alloy which may satisfy the properties required for tube materials of an intermediate heat exchanger for atomic energy steelmaking.
    In case of a constant carbon content of around 0.08 weight %, the highest creep rupture strength in air at 1000°C and 1100°C was observed around Ni-20Cr-20W in the Ni-Cr-W system investigated.
    Creep rupture strengths at 1000°C and 1100°C of the Ni-20Cr-20W alloy increased with increases of the carbon content and solution heat treating temperature and time.
    Details of these phenomena were discussed through the observation of the structures and the analyses of precipitated carbides of materials subjected to the solution heat treatment and the creep rupture test at 1000°C.
    The potential of the Ni-20Cr-20W-xC alloys for the required material seem to be very high.
  • The Mechanical Properties of Wires and Wire Rods Patented in Fluidized Bed

    pp. 1373-1378

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    In order to improve the drawability of wires and wire rods and to obtain the desirous mechanical properties of drawn wires, lead patenting has long been utilized to practical use. There are, however, some problems about environmental hygiene in the works and environmental pollution in the cause of molten lead. As a means of solving those problems, the fluidized bed patenting method has been studied and developed.
    Under the various conditions of fluidized bed temperature, air velocity and cooling time in fluidized. bed, experiments on cooling of heated wires and wire rods in fluidized bed have been carried out. Excellent mechanical properties of the materials patented in fluidized bed, as good as those in lead bath can be obtained by optimization of such factors as fluidized bed temperature, air velocity, cooling time in fluidized bed and austenitizing temperature. The fluidized bed patenting can be successfully applied to the materials from 1 to 11 mm in diameter. The scattering of mechanical properties of the materials patented in fluidized bed is the same as or less than that in lead bath. The drawability of the materials patented in fluidized bed is the same as that in lead bath.
  • On Rapid Heat Patenting of High Carbon Steel Wire Rods

    pp. 1379-1385

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    Rapid heating makes austenite grain of steel finer than usual heating. Study of application of rapid heating to lead patenting of high carbon steel wire rods has been done. After high carbon steel wire rods are rapidly heated and held for short time, they were quenched in oil. High carbon steel wire rods were rapidly heated again followed by cooling in a lead bath. The various properties of wire rods treated described above have been examined.
    Wire rods rapidly heat patented in this process are superior to usual lead patented ones in the following points.
    (1) Austenite grain of rapidly heated wire rods is finer than that of usually heated ones.
    (2) Lead bath temperature in patenting for rapidly heat treated wire rods is lower than that for usually heat treated ones.
    (3) Tensile and fatigue strength of rapid heat patented and drawn wires is higher than those of usual patented ones.
    (4) Drawability and bending properties of rapid heat patented and drawn wire is better than these of usual patented ones.
  • A New Testing Method to Evaluate a Weld Cracking Susceptibility for Stainless Steel Sheets

    pp. 1386-1391

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    Many testing devices have been developed for the determination of the weld cracking properties of the steels. These are mainly applied to the plate, but a few of them to stainless steel sheets under 3.0 mm in thickness. Meanwhile, the troubles of the cracks transverse to welding direction have frequently occurred in producing welded tubes.
    Therefore, authors have designed and used a new method to evaluate a weld cracking susceptibility of stainless steel sheet. Its features are as follows;
    1) Welding bead-on-plate with TIG are under tensile load.
    2) As susceptibility index, using a critical strain, which is the elongation of just beginning to crack, and is obtained from relationship between the elongation and number of cracks in unit length.
    In this paper, firstly, the device has been described in details and secondly, the availability of this method has been shown from the testing results for stainless steels.
  • Successive Determination of Oxygen in Stainless Steels Containing High Manganese or High Aluminium by the Argon Carrier Coulo-matic Counting Method

    pp. 1392-1397

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
    A study was made of the successive method of correct determination of O in stainless steels containing high Mn (9-10%) or high Al (2-3%) by Ar carrier coulomatic counting method. The analytical values decreased in the order of specimens dropping. The accurate values were obtained when the concentration of Mn or Al in bathes were less than 3% and 1.2% respectively. Allowable evaporation concentration of Mn was under 0.5% in order to determine oxygen content accurately. The effect of evaporated Al was not confirmed because of its small amounts. According to the above results, it was confirmed that correct determination of O could be made by limiting in number of specimens thrown into a bath or by controlling the concentration of Mn and Al to be less than 3.5% and 1.2% respectively by dilution of specimen with carbon steel. The concentration of Mn or Al was calculated by the following equation; Mn or Al (%) amounts of Mn (or Al) in a bath (g) + [concn. of Mn (or Al) in specimen (%) ×wt. of specimen (g) ×0.01] /total wt. of metals thrown into a bath (g) ×100
    Total wt. of metals (g) =wt. of carbon steel (g) +wt. of specimen (g) +wt. of Sn×0.81.
  • Metallographic Etching by Means of Electrochemical Method

    pp. 1398-1411

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • Recent Progress of Cathodic Protection Technique for Pipelines

    pp. 1412-1417

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • 第91回講演大会討論会報告

    pp. 1418-1424

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • Report of Steel Pipes and Tubes Committee of the Joint Research Society of ISIJ

    pp. 1425-1448

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • Report of Heat Economy Technique Committee of the Joint Research Society of ISIJ

    pp. 1449-1456

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • 見たり聞いたり, ソ連の2ヶ月

    pp. 1457-1462

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up
  • 抄録

    pp. 1463-1469

    Bookmark

    You can use this feature after you logged into the site.
    Please click the button below.

    Log in / Sign Up

Article Access Ranking

22 Jan. (Last 30 Days)

  1. A Review of the Chemistry, Structure and Formation Conditions of Silico-Ferrite of Calcium and Aluminum (‘SFCA’) Phases ISIJ International Vol.58(2018), No.12
  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement Susceptibility Evaluation of Tempered Martensitic Steels Showing Different Fracture Surface Morphologies Tetsu-to-Hagané Vol.105(2019), No.1
  3. Heat Transfer Characteristic of Slit Nozzle Impingement on High-temperature Plate Surface ISIJ International Advance Publication
  4. Effects of Impurities and Processing Conditions in Al–1%Mn Alloys on the Formation of Thermally Stabilized Substructures MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS Vol.59(2018), No.11
  5. Preparation of High-Carbon Metallic Briquette for Blast Furnace Application ISIJ International Vol.59(2019), No.1
  6. Fusion Zone Microstructural Evolution of Al-10% Si Coated Hot Stamping Steel during Laser Welding ISIJ International Vol.59(2019), No.1
  7. Effect of Annealing Time on Oxides Phases and Morphology along Oxidized Depth of Fe-3%Si Steel during Decarburization ISIJ International Vol.59(2019), No.1
  8. Recent Progress on Advanced Blast Furnace Mathematical Models Based on Discrete Method ISIJ International Vol.54(2014), No.7
  9. Preface to the Special Topics Entitled “To Solve Problems of Hot Rolling Rolls” Tetsu-to-Hagané Vol.104(2018), No.12
  10. Effects of Sulfur and Titanium Interaction in Molten Pig Iron on Erosion of Carbon Brick ISIJ International Vol.59(2019), No.1

Search Phrase Ranking

22 Jan. (Last 30 Days)

  1. blast furnace
  2. blast furnace productivity
  3. blast furnace permeability
  4. 鉄と鋼
  5. titanium
  6. induction furnace
  7. laser welder
  8. a
  9. activity feo
  10. argon steel